Ground Trades Xchange - a landscaping forum

Go Back   Ground Trades Xchange - a landscaping forum > Landscape Services > Landscaping Tools and Equipment
Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read



Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 04-15-2004, 10:35 PM
Nebraska's Avatar
GTX Advisor
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Great Plains
USDA Zone 4
Posts: 1,072
Nebraska is on a distinguished road
Converting single wheel to dual wheel

Does anyone have any knowledge or experience converting single wheel truck to a dual wheel truck either using and adapter kit like this one: http://www.southwestwheel.com/dodgeconverion.htm

or by changing out the rear end?
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 04-15-2004, 10:49 PM
dan deutekom's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
USDA Zone 5
Posts: 1,641
dan deutekom will become famous soon enough
If you are doing this to increase load capacity, I think this would be a dangerous thing to do. You have only stressed light duty parts like the axles, springs and frame more heavily. Also these adapters put a high stress on the wheel bearings because it puts another heavy wheel levering on them from a further distance. I think even changing the axles would not be a very good idea because the truck should be engineered totally for the weight. Heavier trucks have beefier frames and bearings. Also if you beef up the rear of the truck you are only doing half the job. The front axle carries a large proportion of the load as well.
__________________
Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways - Beer in one hand - Nacho's in the other - body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming : Woo Hoo, what a ride!



Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 04-16-2004, 12:22 AM
Gold Oak Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
USDA
Posts: 1,882
Bill Schwab is an unknown quantity at this point
Much better off going to a truck junk yard and sifting through rear ends. Even if you had to weld new spring perches in a different spot, the rear end is made for what it is designed to do. Those bolt on dual wheel kits simply give you 4 wheels in place of two with the same braking capacity, load capacity and rear gear as when they had single wheels.

You should be able to buy a rear end, drum to drum, and perhaps tires and wheels for $700.00.
__________________
Bill Schwab
In the year 1491, if the Naturescape Landscape Company did the site work in Pisa, Italy, they would not be calling it the "leaning" tower.

Encinitas, Ca. 92024

www.naturescapelandscape.com

Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 04-16-2004, 05:00 AM
dan deutekom's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
USDA Zone 5
Posts: 1,641
dan deutekom will become famous soon enough
If you change the rear end you had better check that the master cylinder for the brakes is adequate to handle the larger rear brake system. It will probably need to be changed also.
__________________
Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways - Beer in one hand - Nacho's in the other - body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming : Woo Hoo, what a ride!



Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 04-16-2004, 10:47 AM
Gold Oak Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
USDA
Posts: 1,882
Bill Schwab is an unknown quantity at this point
Dan is right with this one. Best way to check that is call a reputable auto parts store, i.e. Car Quest or Napa. Stay way from Moe Larry and Curly, Crap Auto, and those inferior stores. Have them look up a mastter cylinder for your truck. Then, ask for a cylinder for the one ton dual rear wheel version of your truck. Sometimes it will be different. I was pretty amazed, after our truck got wrecked last year, we found a master had gone out. The F-Super Duty cylinder had the same part number as 8800 GVW Ford trucks that same year, as did the F-350. The difference was in the light 3/4 and the 1/2 ton. I thought for sure that the SuperDuty would be a heavier part than others, because the brakes are larger.

Nonetheless, you will probably drop a grand or more into this endeavor by the time it is all said and done.
__________________
Bill Schwab
In the year 1491, if the Naturescape Landscape Company did the site work in Pisa, Italy, they would not be calling it the "leaning" tower.

Encinitas, Ca. 92024

www.naturescapelandscape.com

Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 04-16-2004, 11:55 AM
Nebraska's Avatar
GTX Advisor
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Great Plains
USDA Zone 4
Posts: 1,072
Nebraska is on a distinguished road
Thanks for the reply's. This is what I love about this site...
After reading these posts there is definitely more to consider than just adding a couple of tires. I get the feeling that the conversion kit is really a cosmetic with the added bonus of a few extra pounds.
If we do anything I'm leaning towards changing the rear end if the other parts match up with the 1 ton. I have a brother that used to work in the gear shop of a salvage yard for 4 years and he saw it done all the time...the big things he saw as far a problems were when they mix matched a 4:10 with a 3:73.

As far as cost if, it matches up part wise, he said about $700, including trade value for the single wheel axle, for the rear-end plus the cost of rims and matching tires.

Thanks for the replys.

Last edited by Nebraska; 04-16-2004 at 11:57 AM..
Reply With Quote
Reply





Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Free Landscaping Magazines

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2
Copyright 2003-2013 Ground Trades Xchange, LLC