Ground Trades Xchange - a landscaping forum

Go Back   Ground Trades Xchange - a landscaping forum > Landscape Services > Heavy Equipment
FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read



Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-25-2005, 09:41 PM
Stonehenge's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Wisconsin
USDA Zone 4
Posts: 9,092
Stonehenge will become famous soon enough
Buying a used skid steer or other equipment

Every year in my market it seems someone goes out of biz, or closes down their shop. Often this means there's a used skid steer, either for sale or at auction.

I know there are guys out there that take good care of their equipment - problem is, I don't know who they are.

If I have the opportunity to buy a used skid steer, what kinds of things should I look at and look for?
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-25-2005, 10:01 PM
Gold Oak Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
USDA
Posts: 1,881
Bill Schwab is an unknown quantity at this point
Look first at hours on the clock, and how many scratches dings and dents are on the belly pans, loader boom, check the hinge bushings to see how tight they are, and look at the grease zirts to see if they take grease. You might even want to bring a gun with you and pump some in. If they don't take it, that is a sign of not being greased enough.

If a machine is a few years old, has been repainted and has new decals, and you can see scrapes into the steel in places, that is a good chance you are getting an old whore with a new dress. I would stay away unless you are looking for something to run as a back up. We are looking at a 5 year old Cat right now, and all that machine will do is sit in the yard and load materials before the trucks pull out. Even if it smokes alot, it's a moot point.

With any deisel engines, while it is running, remove the oil fill cap. If you see alot of smoke comming from the hole, that is a sign of blow by, or, weak compression. Ideally, if you can pull the injectors and take a compression test, anything between 350 to 420 lbs is acceptable, and you need to make sure each cylinder is evenly matched to the next. In other words, you should not have a significant difference on your numbers. If one is say 350, and all the rest are 420, you have a problem starting to cook.

How do all the safety switches perform? Do the guages work?

You can get oil tests done pretty cheap, and they will tell what is if anything, beginning to decompose prior to breaking all the way.

Tire wear is another thing to consider. We found skid steer tires to wear out around 500 hours. If you have a machine with 250 hours and the tires have been trashed, that's a sign of a beating.
__________________
Bill Schwab
In the year 1491, if the Naturescape Landscape Company did the site work in Pisa, Italy, they would not be calling it the "leaning" tower.

Encinitas, Ca. 92024

www.naturescapelandscape.com

Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 03-02-2005, 04:35 PM
Stonehenge's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Wisconsin
USDA Zone 4
Posts: 9,092
Stonehenge will become famous soon enough
Thanks for all the good info. I'm going to print this off for future use...

I have a related question, but for our current machine. Seems that in time all machines get one lift arm out of whack relative to the other. The result is a bucket that digs more on one side than the other. Is there a way to fix this?
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 03-02-2005, 09:53 PM
Gold Oak Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
USDA
Posts: 1,881
Bill Schwab is an unknown quantity at this point
Jeff:

Gehl builds their booms pretty solidly, And short of removing the boom and tweeking the part where it is bent, I am betting it is more a problem related to the hinge or lift pins. Our 4615 used to eat them, other than that it was a great machine. There is a bucket pivot made for most machines, where for $1500 or so, you hook it to the pig tails for the hydro system, and you can rock the bocket up to 22.5 either side. This is a very cool feature when grading on slopes, or if you need to cut swales or even if you are on slightly tilted ground and are moving a pallet of something and have to set it down on ground at a different level.

It basically does the same thing as a 6 way blade, except with a bucket. To clarify, are you saying that if you park the machine on level flat concrete, place the bucket all the way down, that one side is on the pavement, and the other is off the pavement?
__________________
Bill Schwab
In the year 1491, if the Naturescape Landscape Company did the site work in Pisa, Italy, they would not be calling it the "leaning" tower.

Encinitas, Ca. 92024

www.naturescapelandscape.com

Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 03-02-2005, 10:04 PM
Stonehenge's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Wisconsin
USDA Zone 4
Posts: 9,092
Stonehenge will become famous soon enough
If I force it all the way down on level, flat concrete, I can get it flat. But if I just bring it to the point where it first touches concrete, one side touches 1" or so before the other. This difference is amplified when we're excavating, because the low side digs in first, and deeper (which probably makes the problem worse).

We have two weight kits on the back to help us lift big skids of materials - if what you're saying is correct, that could be why - the pins are just wearing out from 6 years of use.

Hey Bill - you must have a very good memory - I didn't mention anywhere here what brand machine we were using.
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 07-29-2010, 08:20 PM
Acorn
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
USDA Zone 1
Posts: 8
griffe2 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Schwab View Post
Look first at hours on the clock, and how many scratches dings and dents are on the belly pans, loader boom, check the hinge bushings to see how tight they are, and look at the grease zirts to see if they take grease. You might even want to bring a gun with you and pump some in. If they don't take it, that is a sign of not being greased enough.
Bill - Great comments on this post. I have a similar question, I created a new thread for it here (if you could take a look):
http://www.groundtradesxchange.com/f...html#post70273

Also - What are these Greeze Zirts? Where can I find them - and what kind a 'gun' are you talking about?
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 08-01-2010, 03:20 PM
Sapling
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: long island new york
USDA Zone 10
Posts: 245
zullo-design is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by griffe2 View Post
Bill - Great comments on this post. I have a similar question, I created a new thread for it here (if you could take a look):
http://www.groundtradesxchange.com/f...html#post70273

Also - What are these Greeze Zirts? Where can I find them - and what kind a 'gun' are you talking about?
Let me google that for you
__________________


www.ZULLO-DESIGN.com
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 08-01-2010, 04:22 PM
Acorn
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
USDA Zone 1
Posts: 8
griffe2 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by zullo-design View Post
Haha... That was awesome..

Sorry - I did Google it and tested them (Wanted to wait until I had something to report back).

So.. It seems the most recent owner didn't grease (About a year 1/2). Some the the 'joints?' had grease, some such as the curl coupling had no grease.

Infact on the curl coupler, I couldn't find a Grease Zert? Did it get broken off? I am looking at the part that connects to the bucket..

Also - the two zerts in the back (for the arms) were very hard to pump... The times that I was able to pump I didn't see any start to appear around the joint... There was some older grease there but after 8 or so pumps I didn't see anything new...

The hoses under the hood seemed fine - it was a little wet around a few but didn't look like a major problem.

Also - When trying to dig some dirt I was able to stall it out very quickly... I assume the fork was stuck under a root and started to lift the rear of the machine but then 'Died'. Is this something I should worry about? I would think it should be able to lift itself without issue?

It was used for CONCRETE by the previous owner (That's why there are weights on the rear wheels).

Any ideas? Let me know if you need pics!
I updated the gallery with some pics of under the hood.
Bobcat 753G Photos
Reply With Quote
Reply

You might like the following content from the Ground Trades Xchange, served by Google:

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Free Landscaping Magazines
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Skid Steer Tiller site Heavy Equipment 20 01-14-2015 04:11 PM
mini skid vs track skid steer vs power trac r schipul Heavy Equipment 35 01-19-2011 12:34 AM
Laser level Grading with Skid Steer??? RIC Landscaping Tools 15 04-12-2010 07:29 PM
Skid steer tracks & root grapple bucket Timber Lane Landscaping Tools 2 08-13-2006 12:59 PM
Second skid steer choice Stonehenge Landscaping Tools 43 04-11-2004 10:29 AM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2003-2016 Ground Trades Xchange, LLC