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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 12-03-2003, 09:19 PM
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I wonder what some of the fees for not having a permit are or getting one later than you should have.
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Old 12-03-2003, 09:23 PM
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There was an article in a recent issue of Horticulture Review that may interest the members here.

Designers discuss permits
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Old 12-03-2003, 09:28 PM
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That's an interesting link thanks. That's for Ontario too, things are a little different down here. Thanks
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Old 12-03-2003, 09:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Will Pacala
... things are a little different down here.
Maybe, but I doubt it.

Building codes in Ontario are designed to protect the saftey of the public just as they are elsewhere.
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Old 12-03-2003, 09:39 PM
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Typically, permits double if you file after the fact...
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Old 12-03-2003, 09:40 PM
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I wonder if some of the difference is market based. There are only a handful of million dollar homes in a 50 mile radius here, so a $1,000 permit fee, if discussed up front, would pretty much see us lose the work.

And for the most part we've been around enough to know when a permit might be required, and even the name of the person to talk to.....I just hate tying up time for that.
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Old 12-03-2003, 11:04 PM
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Quote:
I wonder if some of the difference is market based. There are only a handful of million dollar homes in a 50 mile radius here
In my parts we have plenty of million plus homes. I do not read the real estate ads often but I would say the mean cost of a home I work at is 600-800K. I think Agla said that all landscape contractors consider themselves upscale, I include myself in this group.

The ONLY type of house being built around me are upscale really big homes on really poor lots, that's all thats left. I haven't breached the million plus market, not sure I ever will and I'm quite comfortable in "almost upscale" work.

I could not fathom a contractor telling one of my clients, or the next tier, that they have to go get the permits themselves. These people are WAY TOO BUSY working, living the good life, or vacationing to be bothered.

I wanted to stop by a clients house a Saturday morning to look at a job and she said that that was her time to go to the gym, can't make it (I admire her for sticking to her guns on time for herself). Another client goes to California for weeks at a time and leaves the hubby at home. A favorite was back when I was mowing lawns and a client told me about their visit to Le Circ 2000 and saw Tom Hanks and Bruce Springsteen.
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Old 12-03-2003, 11:26 PM
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Sounds like some dream vacations going on. There are more and more homes not only being built but being sold as well. They are all very high priced.
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Old 12-03-2003, 11:36 PM
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Permits can be a pain. However, they do help keep the "doing it on the side" guy from getting some jobs. Lately I've noticed not so much as needing a permit for patios and the like but, each city is requiring a license. A license which must be completed and on file before you contract any work in their city. We've paid from $100.00 to $250.00 for the license. They are good for one year.

One permit I had to get was a big event. First, I had to submit scaled drawings to the city engineer. Next, I had to submit the color choices and the ratios of each color used to the architectural committee. BTW-it was is backyard patio, which no neighbors could see. Lastly, I had to submit the actual materials to the historical commitee. I could have only been so lucky to charge a grand!

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Old 12-03-2003, 11:39 PM
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I've found that in built up areas permits are needed more because there is less room for things such as patios and walks and all of the other stuff. You need a permit for every little thing in those built up areas which I fear my area is becoming.
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Old 12-04-2003, 12:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Stonehenge
Tim, what have you done in cases where you needed to do more than provide a sketch and pay the fee? I can see that being a big drain on your time
This process isn't nearly as bad as some think it might be. We normally just take out the permits pertaining to the specific work that we are contracted to perform. Any architectural red tape is completely a separate issue, and solely the responsibility of the customer or the GC. Any personal consultation is billed at an hourly rate, and will be separate from the original bid as well.

Most of our permits take less than 1 man hour to acquire, are quite vague, and very repetitious. Typically there is either a linear, sqft, or flat rate levied on the type of work we perform.

Commonly, the general contractors/design builders that we work in conjunction with, have already done all soil/compliance studies, had their prints approved, and will have their general building permits in place before we are even contracted.

Permit fees that would range in the size of $1,000 or more, are typically for very large, multiple site developments, or industrial type work. I do not recall many permits in the private sector ever ranging much over the $250 mark.

I will stick my neck out and state that much of the work being done by GTX's members(excluding walls, electrical, or waterway projects) will normally not require building permits.

Bill brings up some very good points, and I agree.

JW- That carpenter that fed you that line of B.S. will eventually get burnt, and it will be devastating to him financially. Above board and by the book is way easier and cheaper in the long run! Tim
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Last edited by Tim; 12-04-2003 at 12:48 AM..
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Old 12-04-2003, 12:55 AM
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Rex, you have stated and experienced a very big pain in the butt that we have had to comply with too. The Historical Society can negate and halt many common construction materials/methods. We charge a premium to the customers when they get involved. talk about picky! Tim
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