Ground Trades Xchange - a landscaping forum

Go Back   Ground Trades Xchange - a landscaping forum > Landscape Services > Hardscaping
Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read



Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2008, 03:32 PM
Acorn
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
USDA Zone 5
Posts: 8
Jpdst29 is on a distinguished road
best way to cut curves...opinions...

i used to always cut curves by setting my curved soldier course...laying my pavers to it and then filling in the pieces by cutting them on a wet saw.

my problem is that you are cutting a straight line on the paver that is supposed to go along a curve so if it is a long cut on the paver it looks stupid or just plain bad because it doesnt meld nicely...even when filled in with poly sand.

is there a way around this...i have heard of guys cutting curves with their cutoff saws while the pavers are already laid. does anybody do this here? and if so...how has it worked out for you. i would think by applying pressure to certain parts of one paver while cutting this way they would have a tendency to be sunk into the screed bed.

any opinions...
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2008, 04:05 PM
Stonehenge's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Wisconsin
USDA Zone 4
Posts: 9,027
Stonehenge will become famous soon enough
We've done it that way for 5 or more years. And yeah, we often end up cutting into the base by up to an inch, but put a soldier course in and compact it and everything turns out fine. You'll save loads of time and have a better looking project. Good luck.
__________________
Jeff Pozniak, Stonehenge Brick Paving & Landscaping

How would you like some free trade magazines?


Landscaping Appleton, Neenah and Wisconsin's Fox Valley

The Dirt - my blog about running a landscaping business.
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2008, 07:08 PM
dan deutekom's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
USDA Zone 5
Posts: 1,641
dan deutekom will become famous soon enough
I have done it the way Jeff has done it for as long as I can remember. Also use the smallest blade that you can on your saw. This makes it easier to cut tighter curves. I don't remember the last time I used a wet saw. Ours has been sitting in a back shed rusting away for over 20 years.
__________________
Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways - Beer in one hand - Nacho's in the other - body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming : Woo Hoo, what a ride!



Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2008, 07:42 PM
Stonehenge's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Wisconsin
USDA Zone 4
Posts: 9,027
Stonehenge will become famous soon enough
That's funny - we needed some perfectly straight cuts on some block to make an outdoor fireplace and pulled out both of our tub saws - one hadn't been run in 4-5 years. (But it did start on the first pull!)
__________________
Jeff Pozniak, Stonehenge Brick Paving & Landscaping

How would you like some free trade magazines?


Landscaping Appleton, Neenah and Wisconsin's Fox Valley

The Dirt - my blog about running a landscaping business.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 09-09-2008, 10:11 PM
eastern1's Avatar
Seedling
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Eastern Ontario
USDA Zone 5
Posts: 140
eastern1 is on a distinguished road
Cuts are best made with marking out your soldier first, bringing to a table saw (pieces are cut on 90deg instead of angled. Then back to patio or walkway and place soldier. We have mastered this technique years ago.
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 04:33 PM
Stonehenge's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Wisconsin
USDA Zone 4
Posts: 9,027
Stonehenge will become famous soon enough
eastern1 - that's great if productivity is not an issue. You are likely taking 3-4X the amount of time it takes us to do the same project. I know because we did it that way for a short while.

And you'll have a hard time convincing me that a 5 degree angle to a cut paver is going to affect anything with that pavement.
__________________
Jeff Pozniak, Stonehenge Brick Paving & Landscaping

How would you like some free trade magazines?


Landscaping Appleton, Neenah and Wisconsin's Fox Valley

The Dirt - my blog about running a landscaping business.
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 06:45 PM
eastern1's Avatar
Seedling
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Eastern Ontario
USDA Zone 5
Posts: 140
eastern1 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stonehenge View Post
eastern1 - that's great if productivity is not an issue. You are likely taking 3-4X the amount of time it takes us to do the same project. I know because we did it that way for a short while.

And you'll have a hard time convincing me that a 5 degree angle to a cut paver is going to affect anything with that pavement.
3 to 4 times as long I doubt my friend, by the time you set up and cut then regrade your base with a trowel and clean that crap all over the place I'm sipping on a mojito. Mabye not sippin but I've tried your way also and my way is just as quick and my back ain't sore. My cuts are 5 deg. straighter than yours I guess.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 09-13-2008, 03:10 AM
Euroscapes's Avatar
Gold Oak Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
USDA Zone 8
Posts: 31
Euroscapes is on a distinguished road
My brother and I just started cutting with the pavers on the base on our last job, and wow not to mention the time it saved us, but the lines are so much cleaner now, we won't be cutting any other way now.

-Cameron
__________________
Cameron W.
EUROSCAPES Exterior Enhancements Corp.

Landscaping Coquitlam, and throughout the lower mainland of British Columbia
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 09-13-2008, 08:26 AM
Stonehenge's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Wisconsin
USDA Zone 4
Posts: 9,027
Stonehenge will become famous soon enough
eastern - I've done both ways for years, so I have a pretty good handle on what works for us. If it doesn't for you, do your thing. But "cuts are best made" is something each contractor should decide for him or herself.

@euro - I forgot about that, too. Curved lines are perfect, not a hibbedy-dibbedy rollercoaster ride.
__________________
Jeff Pozniak, Stonehenge Brick Paving & Landscaping

How would you like some free trade magazines?


Landscaping Appleton, Neenah and Wisconsin's Fox Valley

The Dirt - my blog about running a landscaping business.
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 09-13-2008, 08:40 PM
Acorn
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Detroit
USDA Zone 5
Posts: 6
muddy waters is on a distinguished road
I also cut the pavers after laying. Having done both, I really can't see the reason for a tub saw any more. To each their own I guess.

A good tip I learned is to run your blade throught the joint between the cut field brick and the soldier course prior to tamping. I creates a nice smooth joint and prevents the edge of the field brick from chipping off during tamp(assuming you cut in on an angle like I do). This is especially useful when using "clean" looking products (ie non-tumbled).
Reply With Quote
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 09-13-2008, 09:58 PM
eastern1's Avatar
Seedling
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Eastern Ontario
USDA Zone 5
Posts: 140
eastern1 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euroscapes View Post
My brother and I just started cutting with the pavers on the base on our last job, and wow not to mention the time it saved us, but the lines are so much cleaner now, we won't be cutting any other way now.

-Cameron
Your lines are cleaner now because you weren't doing it right the other way, its all in the set up of the curves.
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 09-14-2008, 09:57 AM
Tanner's Avatar
Gold Oak Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
USDA Zone 5
Posts: 22
Tanner is an unknown quantity at this point
To each his/her own

We cut everything on the ground with a quick cut. The only time we take out our table saws are for step and wall caps and for bullnose coping around pools. We've done it both ways but cutting on the ground you can really get a nice round cut and in a quarter of the time. We have three installation crews and everyone is left to work in their own way but they all chose this method.

T.
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 09-14-2008, 12:00 PM
eastern1's Avatar
Seedling
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Eastern Ontario
USDA Zone 5
Posts: 140
eastern1 is on a distinguished road
It may be faster, but man who really wants to breathe that poison, don't you guys care about your health? We would be fined by ministry of labour for producing toxic fumes.
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 09-14-2008, 04:59 PM
Sapling
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: long island new york
USDA Zone 10
Posts: 245
zullo-design is on a distinguished road
I usually just use my radius point and my tape scribe a light line on my curve with a pencil then use the cut off saw to scribe it and then just have a guy bring me the marked pavers piece by piece (by the time Im done cutting he's back with the next piece). unless the radius is large enough to make it without removing the pieces, most outside curves are but the insides I prefer to cut outside. either way scribing it with the saw ensures that all the corners line up and the cut looks curved.
__________________


www.ZULLO-DESIGN.com
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 09-14-2008, 06:31 PM
eastern1's Avatar
Seedling
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Eastern Ontario
USDA Zone 5
Posts: 140
eastern1 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by zullo-design View Post
I usually just use my radius point and my tape scribe a light line on my curve with a pencil then use the cut off saw to scribe it and then just have a guy bring me the marked pavers piece by piece (by the time Im done cutting he's back with the next piece). unless the radius is large enough to make it without removing the pieces, most outside curves are but the insides I prefer to cut outside. either way scribing it with the saw ensures that all the corners line up and the cut looks curved.
Exactly but we take it a step further, the guy brings 5 or 6 at a time and puts them back. Its a constant flow, I get a third guy to go behind and lay the soldier or soldiers if there is an offset border and then he does the restraint. Its like clockwork.
Reply With Quote
Reply





Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Free Landscaping Magazines
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
great for marking curves joshuatree Hardscaping 13 11-29-2007 06:38 PM
Gas Portable Cut Off Saw Coxlandscaping Hardscaping 5 07-19-2007 03:22 PM
Cut Off Saws bricknblock Lawn & Landscape Maintenance 6 08-30-2006 07:54 PM
cement drive cut out smittybros Hardscaping 3 08-04-2005 09:14 PM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2
Copyright 2003-2013 Ground Trades Xchange, LLC