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Old 09-12-2006, 09:37 PM
Acorn
 
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installing restraint

I noticed that on some walkways/patios that I've seen the restraint is installed with the "legs" installed on the outside of the pavers whereas others have the "legs" of the restraint installed under the soldier course. What's everyone else doing?
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Old 09-12-2006, 09:47 PM
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Outside.....main reason is we cut the pavers on the ground, and can't do it with the legs in.

Secondly, I don't like it inside as I have found frost heave with the edging and mainly, the spikes, pushes up the soldier course over the years.

People with no freeze thaw can get away with it inside. I can't.
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Old 09-12-2006, 09:50 PM
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penn,
you cut the pavers right on the ground? Just mark a line and use a cut off saw? It does seem like a much faster way of making cuts.
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Old 09-13-2006, 09:02 PM
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we do the restraint the same way as Penn, with the "legs" on the outside. We're based in snow country, Ontario, so we have problems with the freeze and thaw. The spikes will eventually work it's way up, and push the pavers up and unevenly.

As far as cutting on the ground, we try to cut them before we put the border down, but it only works on straight edges, as opposed to curved edges. If the edges are curved, for a patio for example, I just free cut them......trust me, it takes a LOT of practice and experience to be good at that. I install the border/solider course afterwards.

Good luck
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Old 09-13-2006, 10:40 PM
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Epic - I'm not sure I understand "free cutting" versus "cutting on the ground" - we cut them where they lay on the base prep, curves or straight. Some tight inside curves require pulling pavers out to cut them.

We go through and score the entire patio first before cutting.

But yeah, it saves a ton of time.

And then we install the soldier course, then edge restraint facing out.
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Old 09-14-2006, 11:58 PM
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Stonehenge - My definition of "free cutting" is cutting without the use of a string line, chalk line, or marking the bricks with a pencil. It's basically using a concrete cutoff saw, and cutting the bricks as they lay on the ground to create a curve, which will eventually be the edge where a soldier course/border would be laid.

Practice, practice, but I'm sure you, Stonehenge, can do it very well.

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Old 09-15-2006, 01:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by EpicInterlock
Stonehenge - My definition of "free cutting" is cutting without the use of a string line, chalk line, or marking the bricks with a pencil. It's basically using a concrete cutoff saw, and cutting the bricks as they lay on the ground to create a curve, which will eventually be the edge where a soldier course/border would be laid.

Practice, practice, but I'm sure you, Stonehenge, can do it very well.

I think you would have to be real good to cut an outside edge with no markings at all! My guys cut on the ground all the time and mark everything. I would hate to see what would happen if they did not.
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Old 09-15-2006, 01:16 PM
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I think that's where I misunderstood, too. We always mark a line before we cut with welder's chalk, then score, then cut.
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Old 09-15-2006, 01:22 PM
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How much time does it save you, by not marking the curve first?
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Old 09-16-2006, 03:08 AM
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Dont try to do small diameter curves with that one! If it was a big expance of a cut I could see it that way but if its uyp close and personal id use the grease pen or the soap first. I also think its good to use the edge restraint as the ruler just tie a piece of string to either end of the restaint and pull it as tight as you want to bend it. (use big pieces in curves) scribe your line to the bent plastic
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Old 09-16-2006, 03:11 AM
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Super tight curves cant be "pulled off" with just a saw alone. If you can cut tight inside diameter curves with ANY saw let me know!
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Old 09-16-2006, 07:54 AM
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Sleepy, you'd be surprised at what can be cut. I seldom pull the tub saw out. In fact, I've thought about getting it out of the trailer for the fact it takes up so much space and is not getting used. I may just replace it with another cut-off.
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Old 09-16-2006, 02:22 PM
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We've always cut with a tub saw but I'm intrigued about cutting with a cut off saw. I have a Stihl400 and it seems it would be awkward and messy to do it with a large powerful wet saw. It seems the pavers would jump around and the area would get soaked with water. But I'm probably missing something because I believe you guys do more paver work than we do.
I'm curious on an "average" job how long does it take you to mark and cut pavers. Linear foot per hour, I guess.
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Old 09-16-2006, 10:05 PM
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I just dry cut. I think the water would make a mess of the sand. If its small brick in a running bond or a tight inside curve and i think the sands will get chewed up, after i score the cut i'll pull the brick and cut it on top of another brick on the patio then put it right back and just keep kicking the cut-on brick up the patio with me
at the end of next week i have a walkway with 120' of cuts i think it'll take about 4 hours to mark and cut. i'll try and remember to keep track and post it
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Old 09-17-2006, 08:11 AM
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Shakuna, Thanks...how do you deal with the dust...if I'm not mistaken it's considered a real health hazard to breath that stuff in. In fact, from what I read in previous threads here, it's a real OSHA no-no. Plus being bent over with that Stihl for 4 hours as I straddle a walkway might just earn me a trip back to the chiropractor. I do it it (wet) when I cutting the outside edge of bluestone jobs and I know it's not easy.
We probabably average close to 20 linear feet per hour to mark (using a "Paver Scribe") and cut. Not as fast clearly, but not exactly physically demanding either.
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